2018 EDITION

HUMAN RIGHTS INVESTIGATION: FACT-FINDING, DOCUMENTING AND MONITORING

With the participation of scholars and specialists with vast experience in human rights at an international level, the second edition of the International Course on Human Rights was held from 29 October to 2 November.

With more than three hundred applications received, thirty-eight students from twenty-one countries were selected based on their experience and connection with human rights issues.

Not since the end of World War II has it been so imperative to discuss the universal ideal of human rights, the serious challenges for their fulfillment and the possible solutions to the severe global problems that threaten them. With that concern in mind and in line with the contemporary Human Rights agenda of UNESCO and the Sustainable Development Goals, this year, the core topic addressed was “Human rights investigation. Fact-finding, documenting and monitoring.”

Focusing on the distinctive features and the existing differences among tasks related to investigation, fact-finding, documenting and monitoring of specific or systematic violations of human rights, the study of specific cases, the analysis of new technologies and the selection of methodologies were some of the main core topics of the course.

OPENING SPEECH AND GENERAL FORMAT OF THE COURSE

The 2018 edition included an inaugural speech that was open to all, in which more than three hundred people participated: “The Future of Human Rights: Action-Research for a Multipolar and Multimedia World”, by César Rodríguez Garavito, a Colombian jurist and sociologist who is a leading figure on matters related to the defense of human rights in his country. The opening event took place in the Jorge Luis Borges Auditorium of the National Library in the City of Buenos Aires and received the collaboration and comments of guests Guillermo Fernández-Maldonado Castro and Juan Méndez, both also jurists.

Just like in the previous year, the rest of the course took place at the Villa Ocampo Observatory (former residence of Argentine writer Victoria Ocampo that was later donated to the UNESCO), with specific classes and modules given by experts on the subject.

The open interview with a public and leading figure on matters related to human rights was, on this occasion, with Juan Méndez, former special rapporteur of the United Nations on torture.

For the closing of the course and just like in the previous edition, visits were organized to the Space for Memory and for the Promotion and Defense of Human Rights (former ESMA) and the Parque de la Memoria (Memory Park), where the Monumento a las Víctimas del Terrorismo de Estado (Monument to the Victims of State Terrorism) is located.

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